• More dockless scooters and bikes, but fewer dockless companies would operate in DC under a new DDOT plan

      By Caitlin Rogger     September 26th, 2019

      DC could limit shared dockless bike and scooter companies to just four, but increase the number of dockless bikes and scooters to 20,000, under a new proposal released for public comment Wednesday. Currently, Bird, Bolt, Lime, Lyft, Razor, Skip, and Spin operate dockless scooters and JUMP operates both scooters and dockless bicycles.

    • Ellen Jones will be DDOT’s new Chief Project Delivery Officer

      By David Alpert     August 14th, 2019

      When Sam Zimbabwe left to head Seattle's Department of Transportation, he left some big shoes to fill. That position will now go to Ellen Jones, who is currently Deputy Executive Director of the Downtown DC Business Improvement District and previously headed up the Washington Area Bicyclist Association.

    • Whose curb is it, anyway?

      By Caitlin Rogger     July 26th, 2019

      Nine curbside locations around the District will be available to reserve for commercial deliveries starting August 1, the District Department of Transportation (DDOT) recently announced. The three-month pilot gives a company called curbFlow authority to manage the zones.

    • DCST issues RFP for a decongestion pricing study

      By David Alpert     July 3rd, 2019

      Decongestion pricing is cutting down on traffic in London, Stockholm, Singapore, and soon New York. Many other cities are looking at it. Would it make sense for DC? The 2020 DC budget funds "a study that evaluates and makes recommendations regarding the potential benefits of congestion pricing on the District," which DCST is coordinating in partnership with the District Department of Transportation (DDOT). 

    • Video: How are downtown DC’s red hot summer bus lanes working out?

      By Caitlin Rogger     June 17th, 2019

      What’s black and white but red all summer? DC’s H and I street pilot bus-only lanes are getting more publicity, now from a short film produced by TransitCenter and Streetfilms.

    • Road trip! DC Councilmembers try out the H & I pilot bus lanes

      By Caitlin Rogger     June 11th, 2019

      DC’s dedicated bus lanes need long-term political commitment to thrive amid the jungle of competing demands for our street space. That commitment had a visible boost Monday, as a group of DC councilmembers gamely tried out the H & I pilot bus lanes, and shared their thoughts on the value of bus priority in the District.

    • DC rolls out the “red carpet” for new bus lanes

      By David Alpert     May 28th, 2019

      In one more week, buses on H and I streets NW past the White House will have their own dedicated rush hour lanes. Over Memorial Day weekend, DC officials started painting the roadways red in preparation.

    • Do you hear the people signal support for bus lanes?

      By Caitlin Rogger     May 20th, 2019

      Fifty-six percent of Washington area residents think it’s a good idea to change some lanes on the roads into bus-only lanes at rush hour, according to a poll released Friday by the Washington Post. For DC residents, there was even stronger support, with 66%.

    • DC will build a tunnel from the NoMa Metro, delay the K Street Transitway, replace lead pipes, and fund more affordable housing

      By David Alpert     May 14th, 2019

      A long-awaited moment in budget season comes when DC Council Chairman Phil Mendelson releases his package of budget changes, which combine, reconcile, and sometimes reverse things from the individual committees. Here are some of the changes most connected to issues we cover.

    • Mary Cheh will fund more bike lanes, raise residential parking fees, study decongestion pricing, and not keep Circulator free

      By David Alpert     May 2nd, 2019

      DC would get more public space inspectors, dedicated spaces for dockless scooters, and some progress on a long-delayed bike lane on 6th or 9th streets NW, under a draft budget revision from Councilmember Mary Cheh. Meanwhile, the DC Circulator would no longer be free and people would have to pay more for residential parking permits, especially for cars beyond the first.